More

    Pakistan Floods: An ancient site that dates back 4,500 years tries to survive.

    The rains are now threatening a famous archaeological site dating back 4,500 years in flood-stricken Pakistan, where an exceptionally deadly monsoon season has killed hundreds of people, the site's main official warned on Tuesday.

    Pakistan Floods: An ancient site that dates back 4,500 years tries to survive.

    Pakistan Floods: Mohenjo Daro’s current state

    Mohenjo Daro’s ruins, which are a UNESCO World Heritage Site and are situated in southern Sindh province close to the Indus River, are regarded as among South Asia’s best-preserved urban centers. They were found in 1922, and the loss of its civilization—which coexisted with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt’s—remains a mystery to this day.

    A large river in this region of the world, the Indus, has swollen due to severe rains, which have caused widespread flooding and devastation across much of Pakistan. Many experts attribute the abnormally high monsoon rains to climate change, saying that they are to blame for at least 1,343 fatalities and millions of dwellings lost to the rushing waters.

    Pakistan Floods: U.N. Secretary Statement

    U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he will travel to Pakistan on Wednesday. He warned: “Today it is Pakistan. Climate change is supercharging the devastation of our world. ” He claimed that the floods were a result of this. Tomorrow, it might occur somewhere else.

    The Site Curator Says This

    Although Mohenjo Daro has not been directly affected by flooding, the ancient city’s ruins have been harmed by the record-breaking rainfall, according to Ahsan Abbasi, the site’s curator.

    The Associated Press was informed by Abbasi that “a number of large walls, which were constructed approximately 5,000 years ago, have crumbled because of the monsoon rains.”

    Numerous construction workers working under the direction of archaeologists, he claimed, have begun the repairs. Abbasi omitted to assess the cost of the Mohenjo Daro damage.

    Mohenjo Daro’s civilisation, also known as the “Mound of the Dead,” according to Abbasi, “constructed a complex drainage system, which has been essential in preventing flooding in the past, in the regional Sindhi language.

    Despite the fact that the floods affected the entire country of Pakistan, Sindh province was among the hardest hit.

    In an effort to prevent severe flooding in the nearby city of Sehwan, army engineers on Monday made a second cut through an embankment at Lake Manchar, the largest freshwater lake in Pakistan.

    Numerous adjacent villages have already been flooded by water from the lake. That caused hundreds of residents to hastily evacuate their mudbrick homes and many of them to run away in fear.

    Rescue Operations In Pakistan

    As rescue efforts began Tuesday, troops and volunteers used boats and helicopters to transport stranded people away from the inundated districts and to the closest relief centers. These camps are already home to tens of thousands of people, and thousands more have found refuge along roadsides on higher land.

    In broadcast remarks on Tuesday, Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif asked Pakistanis to financially donate to flood victims. The majority of whom are depending on government assistance to survive. Sharif has additionally pleaded with the world community to provide the flood victims with extra relief on numerous occasions. He argued that Pakistan is experiencing a tragedy brought on by climate change.

    U.N. Reports On Pakistan’s Condition

    The U.N. issued a statement on Tuesday. A refugee agency reported that it has sent the Sindh government thousands of tents and other emergency supplies. For the families affected by the province’s flooding.

    According to numerous experts. Pakistan has produced only 0.4% of the heat-trapping carbon dioxide. While the US and China have produced since 1959 (21.5% and 16.4%, respectively). Last Monday, Antonio Guterres, the secretary-general of the United Nations, urged people to avoid “sleepwalking” through the crisis.

    According to Pakistani officials, Guterres will travel to Sindh, but it is unclear if he will visit the archaeological site.

    Also Read: Campa Cola will dominate the market once again, Reliance plans reviving it

    Latest articles

    spot_imgspot_img

    Related articles

    Leave a reply

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here

    spot_imgspot_img
    Translate »