South Carolina lawmakers won’t enact more restrictive abortion regulations!

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On Tuesday, the Republicans in the General Assembly failed to come to an agreement on a complete ban on the practice. This happened during a special legislative session held after South Carolina lawmakers wouldn’t enact more restrictive abortion regulations.

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How South Carolina previously acted on abortion restrictions?

Prior to Roe v. Wade’s landmark decision this summer being overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court, South Carolina has long been at the forefront of extremely strict abortion restrictions that fought it. The state mandates 24-hour waiting periods before abortions, ultrasounds, and parental approval.

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However, several Republicans in South Carolina held off on passing restrictions after seeing how they really played out in other states.

Exceptions of measures

The measure was probably terminated for this session by a House vote on Tuesday. Republicans in the House insisted on a complete ban on abortions, with the exceptions being only for rape or incest-related pregnancies, or if the mother’s life was in danger.

They said that the version that the state Senate approved earlier this month was too weak. The Senate upheld the state’s current prohibition against abortions following the onset of heart activity in a fetus, which is typically about six weeks. It did reduce the window of opportunity for abortions for rape or incest victims from 20 weeks to 12 weeks.

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Even so, it is no longer in force. The previous 20-week abortion ban remains in effect as a result of the South Carolina Supreme Court’s decision to halt implementation of the legislation. This was because it considers it violates the state constitution’s guarantee of the right to privacy.

Republican Rep. John McCravy, who is the bill’s sponsor in the House ,made a statement. He said he was astounded to see support for a complete ban diminish after Roe v. Wade was overturned. We believed that candidates who campaigned on pro-life platforms would remain pro-life and steadfast in their political beliefs, McCravy added.

Temporary or permanent

The House’s 95-11 vote on Tuesday, in which nearly all of the Democrats joined the majority of Republicans, didn’t completely rule out amending the abortion rules before new House members are elected.

A panel of three legislators from each house would work on a compromise. It is between the Senate measure and the House version if the Senate returned and insisted on its version.

What South Carolina President Thomas Alexander said?

However, Republican Senate President Thomas Alexander said the decision rendered enacting a law in the special session “virtually impossible.” This was because senators demonstrated earlier this month that there aren’t enough votes in the 46-member body for a ban sooner than six weeks.

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Credit: AP News

“A stronger pro-life law has my support. The fetal heartbeat law, which is currently at legal risk, must be strengthened in order to preserve as many unborn lives as possible once we recognize it is impossible to pass ” The remark was made by Alexander.

A near-total prohibition was put on hold in the Senate by three Republican women and two of their GOP colleagues.

During the discussion earlier this month, Republican Senator Katrina Shealy made a statement. ” I do support life. Additionally, I support the mother’s right to a life with her already-born children. I care about the kids who are compelled to become adults by a male-dominated legislature so they can feel good about it. “

The outcome of the election on Tuesday may affect the contest for governor. In six weeks, Republican incumbent Henry McMaster will be up for reelection. He has stated that he opposes abortion in the state. Democratic contender Joe Cunningham has argued that Republicans lack the necessary two-thirds majority to override a veto.

Todd Rutherford views:

Todd Rutherford, the minority leader of the Democratic Party in the House, said it wasn’t time to rejoice since many women don’t realize they are pregnant until they are six weeks along and because he expects women to resort to desperate measures if their freedom of choice is restricted.

Image of South Carolina court during proceedings
Credit: AP News

However, Rutherford expressed his desire that Republicans uphold their commitments made during the debate to do more to support birth control access, maternal and infant health care, and educational opportunities for children born in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

“Many of us are sick of talking about how life begins at conception and ends there. I’m aware that Democrats are sick of it, and I hope that enough Republicans are too, “said Rutherford.

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